PVC Pipe Sculptures In Motion

Korean artist Duck-Bong Kang has created sculptures that look as though they are in motion by putting together multiple cuts of PVC pipe and then covering them in a thick shellac of urethane paint.

The figures in Kang’s sculptures are an exploration of human relationships and communication. According to Kang, holes ignite curiosity within people because, regardless of age or gender, one always wonders what is on the other side of them. He believes that we should be just as curious about what is on another person’s mind. In his opinion, the rise of social networks has decreased the amount of concrete personal conversation.

The holes also represent the void within ourselves that we helplessly try to fill. As he explains, “When we care too much about how we are seen through other people’s eyes rather than focusing on who we really are, we start to feel a sense of self-betrayal. The existential void may lead us to cry out, with the weight of depression caused by this in-authenticity.”

As you can see, Kang’s work may seem like pieces of PVC pipes put together, but there is much more deeper meaning behind it. To view his pieces in person, visit Seoul, Korea through December 23rd where these sculptures will be displayed at the Gallery 4Walls as a part of his solo show, Disguise.





Gallery 4walls Website
via [Colossal]



January 24, 2017

New Intricately Detailed Tiny Animal Embroideries Made With Meticulous Stitching

Embroidery artist Chloe Giordano crafts stunningly sewn hoop art at an impossibly small scale. After first marveling at her embroidered animals last year, she’s back with even more meticulously stitched woodland creatures. Some of them are no larger than a thimble. Using subtle color changes and countless passes of the satin stitch, Giordano mimics the look of fur on hopping rabbits, sleepy squirrels, and scurrying mice.

Read Article


January 23, 2017

People Share Their Powerful Reasons for Joining the Women’s March

On Saturday, January 21—President Trump’s first full day in office—millions of people across cities, countries, and even continents took to the streets to fight for gender equality and reject the newly-inaugurated president’s attitude toward women. Although achieving equal rights was the primary goal of the march, many participants have flocked to Twitter to share their specific and personal reasons for joining the cause using the hashtag, #WhyIMarch.

Read Article


Get Our Weekly Newsletter