Mystical Indoor Rain Room Where Visitors Don’t Get Wet

This interactive artwork by Random International allows visitors to experience the rain whenever they feel like it. Based in London, Random International studio creates all kinds of installations that explore behavior and interaction, often using light and movement as the foundation for their artworks. The Rain Room, an exhibition supported by the Arts Council England and made possible by the generous support of the Maxine and Stuart Frankel Foundation for Art, is located at the Curve in the Barbican Centre in London.

In the exhibit, a 100 square meter grate hangs overhead in the center of the room, from which a continuously falling rain shower streams. Visitors can experience the pitter patter sound of raindrops hitting the ground and the moisture in the air without actually getting wet. As they walk through the indoor rainfall, sensors detect their motions and the water is directed away from them in what the studio describes as a “carefully choreographed downpour that responds to your movements and presence.”

Visitors become part of the installation as they walk, move, and spin among the drops, feeling what it might be like to actually control the weather!












Random International website
via [The Telegraph]



December 2, 2016

Sexy French Farmers Pose for Shirtless 2017 Calendar

Last year, the holiday season was set ablaze by France’s Pompiers Sans Frontières (Firefighters Without Borders) and their sizzling, stripped-down calendar. Shot for a good cause by renowned Paris-based fashion photographer Fred Goudon, the risqué calendar proved to be a popular Christmas gift—both in France and abroad. In keeping with tradition, Goudon has photographed a new crop of au naturel pin-up models for his 2018 edition: French farmers.

Read Article


December 1, 2016

Meticulous Landscape Paintings Beautifully Represent Intangible Emotional States

Artist Crystal Liu intimately ties her emotional states to beautiful abstract paintings. In large-scale works, she constructs landscapes that are metaphors for the intangible forces that drive us. Visually, elements of the Earth and sky are the actors for the feelings we cannot easily imagine. Together, the sun, mountains, and more depict “narratives of conflict, entrapment, longing, and precarious hope.” These symbols allow Liu to seem removed, yet make the pieces deeply personal.

Read Article


Get Our Weekly Newsletter