Ray Caesar’s Heartless Nymphs


Ray Caesar is one of the most celebrated digital artists of the Pop Surrealism movement. Born in London at the age of 17, he moved to Toronto with his family. There, he worked in the Art & Photography department of the Hospital For Sick Children, documenting disturbing cases of child abuse, surgical reconstruction, psychology, and animal research. Coupled with inspiration from surrealists Kahlo and Dali, Caesar's experiences at the hospital continue to influence his artwork. His haunting imagery is created digitally using 3D modeling software called Maya, mastered while working in digital animation for television and film industries.

Caesar’s works are both grotesque and beautiful. As he explains it, it’s like facing something unpleasant with calm and looking beyond what you’re viewing to see the beauty within.

His work is known for his complex compositions, particular use of light, underlining expressions, poses, and unreal movements. His Victorian girls are often icy with huge wigs, masks, over-sized heads, alarmingly cherry-red lips, blotchy skin, and tattoos that never lose their provocative style.















Ray Caesar’s webpage
via [The New Black]



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