Real Life Superheroes (11 pics)

In real life, do superheroes exist? Apparently so, and photographer Peter Tangen has the proof. At first, The Real Life Superhero Project was conceived as an avenue to shine light on a new breed of activism and altruism, through a photographic installation to benefit the established organizations the superheroes believe in. But as more people were brought into the wholly volunteer project, largely through Tangen's infectious enthusiasm, the scope and purpose expanded exponentially. So who are these modern day heroes? According to Tangen, “they are our neighbors, our friends, our family members. They are artists, musicians, athletes, and yes, politicians. “Anonymous and selfless, they choose every day, to make a difference in the world around them. Whether it be feeding the hungry, comforting the sick, or cleaning up their neighborhoods, they save real lives in very real ways. These are not ‘kooks in costumes,’ as they may seem at first glance. They are, simply put, a radical response… to a radical problem.”

Thanatos

Zetaman

Geist

KnightVigil

Citizen Prime

Life

Nyx

Super Hero

The Crimson Fist

DC's Guardian Real Life Superheroes



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Intricately Detailed Floating Cube Casts Stunning Shadows

We have always been big fans of Pakistan-born artist Anila Quayyum Agha’s mesmerizing art. In 2014, we raved about Intersections, a captivating wooden cube that cast dreamy shadows with a single light bulb. Fortunately for us, Agha is still creating intricate installations in this style, with her most recent, radiant piece being All The Flowers Are For Me. Like Intersections, All The Flowers Are For Me plays with light and space.

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December 9, 2016

Researchers Disover First Feathered Dinosaur Tail Preserved in Amber

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