Retro-Modern Design: LG’s Classic TV


Are you one of those people who drools over the thought of a 60-inch plasma tv? Well, then move on. This post is definitely not for you. However, if you’re one of those people who long for simpler days, you know, when we had four channels to choose from rather than four billion (yes, I am exaggerating), than you’ll be smitten by this new retro TV by LG. The LG Classic TV features a 14-inch diagonal screen, color-matched rabbit-ear antennae and chrome legs. It has knobs for changing channels and adjusting volume. However, this set also has a modern digital tuner, composite video for your retro video game console (Nintendo NES!), and a wireless remote so it's not completely old-school. Plus – if you want to really feel like a kid again and watch reruns of Gilligan’s Island or Brady Bunch in your onesie, you can flip the tv between full color, black & white and sepia tone modes.

Unfortunately, the tv is only available in Korea right now for about $215. Of course, you could always go to your Bengay smelling grandma’s house and hijack hers if you’re that cruel.

Via Engadget and Technobob



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