Old Romania Salt Mines Converted Into 370ft Deep Museum


Inside the old Salina Turda Salt Mines located in Transylvania, Romania, stands the world’s largest salt mine museum. Originally established in the 17th century, the massive mines were formed completely by hand and machine rather than by using explosives. Visitors are invited to descend as far down as almost 400 feet into the Earth in order to witness the history of the trade.

Throughout the cool interior, which averages about 50-55F with 80% humidity, there are a variety of mines, rooms, and spaces to be explored. At almost 140 feet down, Rudolph Mine offers a 180-seat amphitheater, a carousel, ping-pong tables, basketball hoops, mini-golf, and bowling. Old machinery still stands within the underground expanse and some of it is used to lead people on tours.

Theresa Mine, at 370 feet deep, provides access to a small lake where boats can be rented and a rotating wheel allows visitors to see the stalagmites throughout the cave. Finally, the Gisela Mine (the stationary room) functions as an area for health treatments that draws upon and takes advantage of the mine’s optimal climate.




















Turda Salt Mines website
via [Designboom], [Atlas Obscura]



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