Shared Table Where People Can Work and Cats Can Wander

Wait a minute. Is that a cat inside a table? Created by Ruan Hao for Hangzhou and Hong Kong-based architecture firm LYCS, CATable is a functional wood table that’s designed for both people and cats! Like we’ve seen many times before, there’s been a growing trend of transforming livable spaces for the comfort of your cat. While German design company Goldtatze took that to an extreme with this indoor playground and, while, interior designer Jillian Northrup and her husband architect Jeffrey McGrew made it their mission to create this amazing transportation tube, this table is something that’s a bit more attainable.

With the proper-sized holes and long passageways, the table encourages cats to roam freely around your workspace. Their natural curiosity would be satisfied by exploring the unknown paths behind each hole. According to the architecture firm, the desk was created due to cat owners’ shared experience: “Putting away the cat from your lap top was like a sentimental ritual of temporary farewell.”

As Hao succinctly states, “It is a table for us, and a paradise for cats.” CATable was exhibited at this year’s Milan Design Week.

LYCS Architecture: Website | Facebook
via [Freshome]



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