Interactive Light Projections Produce Futuristic Sculptures

In 2011, Sober Industries and Studio Rewind teamed up to develop these dynamic and mesmerizing animal light displays. The installation, entitled Welcome to the Future, featured two wooden sculptures–one owl and one rhinoceros–with all kinds of futuristic patterns and shapes projected onto the surface. The changing patterns of light kept audiences captivated with the sensation that the sedentary creatures were alive and moving.

The two pieces were shown during the Rotterdamse Museumnacht 2011, an annual event where museums and galleries stay open extra hours in the evening to draw in larger crowds. During this outdoor exhibit, visitors could control the projected visuals by tilting a custom-made motion sensor cube back and forth and by pressing buttons that skipped through the lighting options. Each colorful arrangement was more unexpected than the next, producing a captivating display of light. To see the illuminated sculptures, check out the video below.









Sober Industries website
Studio Rewind website
via [Visual News]



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