10,000 Chopsticks Form Huge Mythological Dragon

This giant dragon sculpture is an innovative creation made completely out of 10,000 chopsticks. Simply called Chopsticks Dragon, the piece was developed to promote the opening of Aziatage Caf, located in Yekaterinburg, Russia, which opened its doors in the spring of 2012 on the Day of the Dragon. In honor of the celebration and to attract the attention of residents in the area, Russia-based agency StreetArt assisted advertising agency Voskhod in producing the interactive piece.

During the public art installation, spectators were invited to participate in the creation of the legendary mythological creature. Each person was presented with a pair of chopsticks and asked to place the first one in an existing slot on the board while making a wish. The second served as an incentive to visit the caf, offering a 10% discount on their next meal. The final piece was installed next to the main entrance and serves as a visually enticing advertisement. If interested, you can check out the creative process in the video below.





StreetArt on Behance
via [Lustik]



January 20, 2017

21 Edible Works of Art That Are Almost Too Good to Eat

Everybody knows that you’re not supposed to play with your food—but no one ever said anything about crafting it! Created entirely from food, this collection of edible works of art is as appetizing as it is artistic. From museum-worthy lollipops and decorative-art-inspired cookies to bento bunnies and sushi crafted into koi fish, each culinary creation puts a yummy spin on artistic expression.

Read Article


January 19, 2017

Magical Photos of the World’s Oldest Lake Frozen Over

Thought to be the world’s oldest lake, Lake Baikal in southern Siberia is also one of the world’s deepest, and one of the clearest. These combined characteristics make it a prime location for photographers on any occasion. But photographer Kristina Makeeva took things a step further when she recently walked on the frozen lake for a set of incredible photographs. This freshwater lake reaches depths of 5,387 feet (1,642 meters)

Read Article


Get Our Weekly Newsletter