Struggling to Find Her Identity (7 photos)

If you’ve ever struggled with who you are, you’ll find this editorial incredibly fascinating. Featured in the Art issue of WestEast Magazine, Identity is a series of photos that have been digitally altered to show the transformation of a person's self. With concept and direction by Jeffrey Wang and photographed by Liang Su, it demonstrates how a human being can be affected by the external forces of the world. “This is a chronicle progression of a woman. A woman who morphs from innocence to struggles, and back to innocence. From a state of purity, when there is no good and bad, to sophistication, which comes with seduction, greed, debauchery amongst all other evils that dominate the world. On the verge of decadence she struggles, for individuality, for virtue, for her own soul. In the end amidst all chaos, she unites with peace of mind, living with a sober fact that she is just one of them, and she can't hide. That is her IDENTITY, whether she likes it or not.”

BlanQ Thanks, Marica, for the tip!





December 2, 2016

Sexy French Farmers Pose for Shirtless 2017 Calendar

Last year, the holiday season was set ablaze by France’s Pompiers Sans Frontières (Firefighters Without Borders) and their sizzling, stripped-down calendar. Shot for a good cause by renowned Paris-based fashion photographer Fred Goudon, the risqué calendar proved to be a popular Christmas gift—both in France and abroad. In keeping with tradition, Goudon has photographed a new crop of au naturel pin-up models for his 2018 edition: French farmers.

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December 1, 2016

Meticulous Landscape Paintings Beautifully Represent Intangible Emotional States

Artist Crystal Liu intimately ties her emotional states to beautiful abstract paintings. In large-scale works, she constructs landscapes that are metaphors for the intangible forces that drive us. Visually, elements of the Earth and sky are the actors for the feelings we cannot easily imagine. Together, the sun, mountains, and more depict “narratives of conflict, entrapment, longing, and precarious hope.” These symbols allow Liu to seem removed, yet make the pieces deeply personal.

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