Surreal Clouds Hover Above London’s Trains


A wonderfully whimsical new art installation was just unveiled in London. Called “‘Cloud I Meteoros,” it shows gray statues sitting on top of two fluffy-looking white clouds. Suspended above the historic Barlow Shed of London’s St Pancras Station, the public artwork was created by British sculptor Lucy Orta and her husband Jorge.

A warm and charming welcome to the nearly one million visitors to the station each week, the installation shows travelers taking a magic carpet ride into an imaginary journey in the skies.

As the artists state on their website, “Meteoros is a word derived from ancient Greek, meaning raised from the ground, suspended, lofty or in the midst. Clouds have long been intercessors between reality and the imagination, between heaven and earth, lightness and gravity. They inhabit the skies of Renaissance fresco paintings, often depicted crowded with laymen and prophets, angels and deities. Throughout history, this celestial vault has been a site of conviviality, of learning and exchange.”

This installation will be up until the end of 2013. Love the surreal feeling to them.








Studio Orta website
Photo credit: Sam Lane



December 9, 2016

Intricately Detailed Floating Cube Casts Stunning Shadows

We have always been big fans of Pakistan-born artist Anila Quayyum Agha’s mesmerizing art. In 2014, we raved about Intersections, a captivating wooden cube that cast dreamy shadows with a single light bulb. Fortunately for us, Agha is still creating intricate installations in this style, with her most recent, radiant piece being All The Flowers Are For Me. Like Intersections, All The Flowers Are For Me plays with light and space.

Read Article


December 9, 2016

Researchers Disover First Feathered Dinosaur Tail Preserved in Amber

Researchers in Myanmar made an incredible discovery last year by finding the first dinosaur tail preserved in amber. The findings were published recently in Current Biology and are all the more incredible due to that fact that the tail was covered in feathers. Paleontologist Lida Xing made the discovery in a local market, where amber is frequently sold for jewelry.

Read Article


Get Our Weekly Newsletter