Spectacular Tiny Sculptures Made of Recycled Watches

New Jersey-based artist Sue Beatrice, aka All Natural Arts, creates spectacular steampunk sculptures made out of old watch parts. With the environment in mind, her clever little creations are made entirely out of recycled materials that offer a bit of whimsy. The discarded and found objects (gears, sprockets, vintage pocket watches, etc.) are upcycled and repurposed into unique items that boast themes of nature.

The pieces that Beatrice creates range from animals like lions and horses to supernatural and mythical creatures like fairies. In either case, the artist celebrates nature and the spirit of the Earth. She presents the hidden and often overlooked beauty of aged or weathered items in an effort to encourage reusing instead of disposing and thereby accumulating waste on a planet that has limited resources.

To purchase one of Beatrice’s amazing creations, you can contact her through her website.








All Natural Arts website
via [Karen Hurley]



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