Street Art Project Spreads 4,000 Blue Butterflies Throughout the World

Artist Tasha Lewis has started a global street art project where she will create 4,000 magnetic butterflies and then send them in packs of 400 to 10 groups around the world. In total, the swarms of butterflies will travel to 100 different homes, hopefully landing in all seven continents. Born from the fact that, as an individual artist living in New York City, she would not be able to travel as much as she would like, she hopes this installation will spread far and wide. Each of the ten packages will contain 400 butterflies, a notebook, a how-to guide and a medical kit for butterfly repair.

Once a person receives the package, he or she has four weeks to travel with the butterflies, install them around their homes and then photograph them. They are asked to share their installation through social media sites like Twitter and Facebook. Then, once the four weeks are up, they’re asked to pack up all the supplies and ship them to the next location. For each package, the process repeats 10 times. Lewis hopes to wrap up the project with a gallery show where she’ll display all of the images of the installations.

If you’d like to participate, it’s not too late. Head on over to this page to read over the requirements.







Swarm the World website



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