Librarians Show Off Their Risqu Side Through Tattoos

Last fall, the Rhode Island Library Association (RILA) launched their first-ever Tattooed Librarians of the Ocean State 2014 calendar. Proving that librarians aren’t just strict, buttoned-up middle aged women, this calendar features 12 librarian and library workers who are proud of their jobs and of their rebellious ink. Each photograph captures the models showing off not only their love of books, but highlights their tattoos as well.

This cheeky and fun calendar was for a good cause; It was a fundraiser for the RILA, and an entirely volunteer project for all involved. The light-hearted photographs caught the attention of major media outlets and sold out.

Today, libraries are more than just books. They are places where people can access technology, and programming for all ages.. The RILA explains the idea behind their calendar, writing, "Libraries are unique as they simultaneously foster the preservation of histories and traditions, while fighting censorship and fostering cutting-edge learning environments. Likewise, tattoos can also represent the preservation of history and resistance of the norm."








Rhode Island Library Association website

[Via Inspire First and Flavorwire]



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