Innovative Suspended Tent Means You Can Sleep in the Trees

In 2012, tree house architect Alex Shirley-Smith was a man with a vision – he wanted people to experience the magic of hanging out in a tree. So, he designed Tentsile, a portable suspended tree house that you can take anywhere. This innovative product has the comfort and versatility of a hammock with the security and multi-person occupancy of a tent. There's no need to worry if it's raining and the ground is wet because you're sitting above it all. The structure is waterproof, UV resistant, and comes with insect mesh roofs. You're secured by three anchor points and floor straps that divide the space into individual hammocks.

Tentsile wants to make the world your playground. While you can still pitch it conventionally in dry conditions, it could accompany you on a safari, a mountain, a beach retreat, and more. This means that the sky really is just the limit for any of your outdoor adventures.

Tentsile website
via [This Isn’t Happiness]



December 7, 2016

Mom Prepares Healthy Meals as Cartoon Characters for Son to Eat

Getting pint-sized, picky eaters to finish their fruits and vegetables can be a tricky task for many parents. For food artist Laleh Mohmedi, however, it’s a piece of cake. Using healthy ingredients and a bit of creativity, the Melbourne mom dishes out meals inspired by her 4-year-old son’s favorite animated characters. From expressive Pixar monsters to a spot-on Spongebob Squarepants, Mohmedi reproduces a range of beloved childhood icons out of meat, pasta, and other dinner staples.

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December 7, 2016

Beautiful Vintage Light Bulbs Feature Luminous Floral Filaments

LED light bulbs are all the rage nowadays, but you can’t beat the timeless beauty of vintage filaments. Between the late 1930s and into the 1970s, the Aerolux Light Corporation produced novelty bulbs with tiny sculptures inside. These decorative filaments take the shapes of flowers and birds which are electrically illuminated in a variety of vibrant colors. To construct these bulbs, Aerolux used low-pressure gas in their filaments—either neon, argon, or both.

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