The Masterpiece on NYC’s Highline

As I walked across New York City’s famous High Line for the first time a couple years ago, I was stopped in my tracks by an extraordinary artwork that immediately caught my eye. After admiring it for a few minutes, I never really thought I’d come across it again.

As I was scrolling through Valerie Hegarty’s website last night, I was pleasantly surprised to see the stunning piece once again. The work, entitled Autumn on The Hudson Valley with Branches, imagines a nineteenth century Hudson River School landscape painting that has been left outdoors, exposed to the elements. The piece, made of fiberglass, aluminum rod, apoxy, treated plywood, vinyl, acrylic paint and artificial leaves, looks fantastically different in every season.

Tattered and frayed, Hegarty's painting is based on Jasper Francis Cropsey's Autumn on the Hudson River of 1860. The partially exposed stretcher bars appear to be morphing into tree branches, as if reverting back to their natural state. As Hegarty describes it, her piece will “appear as if nature has become the artist, altering the idealized image of the early American wilderness to be a more layered representation of the area and times today.”








Valerie Hegarty’s website



December 10, 2016

World Map Reveals What Each Country Does Better Than Any Other

Designer David McCandless of Information is Beautiful has created a fascinating world map called International Number Ones. “Because every country is the best at something,” McCandless also offers the caveat that this accolade is “according to data,” which makes perfect sense once you study the map. Being the number one at something isn’t necessarily a compliment. Many countries are the “best” when it comes to issues that are morally reprehensible.

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December 9, 2016

Intricately Detailed Floating Cube Casts Stunning Shadows

We have always been big fans of Pakistan-born artist Anila Quayyum Agha’s mesmerizing art. In 2014, we raved about Intersections, a captivating wooden cube that cast dreamy shadows with a single light bulb. Fortunately for us, Agha is still creating intricate installations in this style, with her most recent, radiant piece being All The Flowers Are For Me. Like Intersections, All The Flowers Are For Me plays with light and space.

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