Topography Landscapes Created in a Water-Filled Tank


Photographer Kim Keever messes with our minds with his intriguing works of art. His large-scale photos are created through the construction of topographies inside a 200 gallon tank that is filled with water. Keever brings the dioramas to life through colorful lighting, which in turn makes for amazing atmospheres. It is all about timing as he must quickly capture the results before it's too late.

Keever's influences resides in Luminism, an American landscape painting style of the mid-1850s which was characterized by effects of light in landscapes, and the Romanticism movement. The David B. Smith Gallery in Colorado has his work on exhibition from now until November 19.Here they share their thoughts on his work."The symbolic qualities he achieves result from his understanding of the dynamics of landscape, including the manipulation of its effects and the limits of spectacle based on our assumptions of what landscape means to us."If you live in the area or happen to be passing by, make sure to check this exhibition out. His work wonderfully reflects the beauty of Colorado.







David B. Smith Gallery website



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