Extremely Detailed Woodcut Print Completed After 3 Years of Meticulous Hand-Carving

Husband and wife team Paul Roden and Valerie Lueth are the artistic minds behind Tugboat Printshop. Established in 2006, the two employ the traditional process of printmaking to create high quality and affordable contemporary pieces. Through their work, the talented pair strive to keep the art of printmaking alive, fostering public appreciation and interest in the traditional process. After three years of meticulous drawing, carving, and printing, their original colour woodblock print Outlook has finally been unveiled.

Outlook is a dizzyingly detailed 46? x 30? landscape carving depicting rolling hills, sweeping fields, pine-dotted mountain ranges, and lush forests. The piece was created using original black "key block" and 4 alternative plates of varied colours that contain varying details. Successional printing of these plates create the myriad of careful hues and rich details apparent in the final product.

Limited edition prints of Outlook will be available for purchase on Tugboat Printshop's website, in a singular piece or diptych and triptych prints.

Tugboat Printshop: Website | Facebook | Flickr
via [Colossal]



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