Two-Faced Portraits Merge to Reveal True Emotions


How many times have you wanted to shout out at the top of your lungs, whether it be from triumph or frustration, only to opt for a subdued grimace or blank stare? Quebec-based photographer Ulric Collette presents a visual interpretation of the faces we make in public coupled with the emotion we’re actually feeling inside in his latest series titled Facade.

Collette, who you may remember from his viral hit series Genetic Portraits, uses his expert hand at photo editing to merge two faces of the same person into one image. The result is a a series of three-eyed beings expressing two differing sets of reactions. It’s a quick shock at first to see the photographer’s deformed subjects’ faces but it doesn’t take long to recognize what he’s trying to convey. Each person has their poker face on, concealing their true inner feelings of excitement, anger, sadness, joy, mischievousness, paranoia, or disgust. The series reflects the dueling public and private personas that just about everyone can attest to.








Ulric Collette website





December 7, 2016

Mom Prepares Healthy Meals as Cartoon Characters for Son to Eat

Getting pint-sized, picky eaters to finish their fruits and vegetables can be a tricky task for many parents. For food artist Laleh Mohmedi, however, it’s a piece of cake. Using healthy ingredients and a bit of creativity, the Melbourne mom dishes out meals inspired by her 4-year-old son’s favorite animated characters. From expressive Pixar monsters to a spot-on Spongebob Squarepants, Mohmedi reproduces a range of beloved childhood icons out of meat, pasta, and other dinner staples.

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December 7, 2016

Beautiful Vintage Light Bulbs Feature Luminous Floral Filaments

LED light bulbs are all the rage nowadays, but you can’t beat the timeless beauty of vintage filaments. Between the late 1930s and into the 1970s, the Aerolux Light Corporation produced novelty bulbs with tiny sculptures inside. These decorative filaments take the shapes of flowers and birds which are electrically illuminated in a variety of vibrant colors. To construct these bulbs, Aerolux used low-pressure gas in their filaments—either neon, argon, or both.

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