Ultimate Pirate Ship Bedroom (14 pics)

“The rope bridge is connected to the top of the jail cell, built to accommodate evil doers, thieves and little sisters.”

Designer Steve Kuhl fulfills every boy’s fantasy with this insanely cool pirate ship bedroom. The six-year-old occupant from Minnesota chose between a space ship, race car, castle, and pirate ship. Most of us would probably agree, he made an excellent decision.

The main feature of the room is the incredible floating pirate ship. Kuhl used 2×12 ribs to construct the hull of the ship, covering them with layers of 1/2 inch plywood to act as the planking. A bomb-proof blend of plaster and epoxy with integrated coloring was used simulate an old ship’s hull.

But that’s not all. The room is also decked out with a rope bridge that connects the pirate ship to the top of a jail cell, and a rope suspended from the ship’s hull provides drop-in access to the closet. There’s also a completely hidden spiral slide, that lets you travel downstairs in a more adventurous way.

Update: We talked to designer Steve Kuhl, asking him about the story behind the ultimate pirate ship bedroom. Read that exclusive interview here.


“This is what it looks like when you enter the bedroom. You will notice the side of the hull is peppered with cannon ports. They also serve as peep holes for watching the uncool masses below.”


“Our client wanted us to build a one-of-a-kind bedroom for a one-of-a-kind son. We concepted a space ship, race car, and castle before landing on this design. What self-respecting six year old wouldn’t want a pirate ship?”


“The base of the rope bridge is anchored on top of the jail cell. We welded a custom steel door for that real jail feeling. Invite Bubba to complete the effect.”


“As with many of the things we build, this is was a first. Ultimately we derive great satisfaction out of overcoming odd design challenges. It’s sort of like that good pain you feel the day after a heavy workout.”


“We constructed the crows nest using a ten inch hand-hewn timber for extra strength. Not seen here is a bed where important friends may get to sleep.”


“Tell your pal to put her coat in the last locker and watch her reaction as she discovers the hidden room within. A motion sensitive switch triggers the light to turn on, revealing an odd yet intriguing orange hole in the wall at waist height.”


“Steve Kuhl tests the slide for accuracy. Also, he is carefully calibrating important features along the way. This procedure needed to be repeated for the better part of a day to insure proper slide operation.”


“Steve is ejected with great speed into the sport court at the bottom of the slide. The slide itself ran a total of 55 lineal feet and was procured from a local community center looking to upgrade.”


“Here you can see how the slide is built. We housed it in such a way that it is completely hidden with the exception of the entrance and exit. The adjacent staircase allows the less adventurous to go the old fashioned way if they prefer.”


“Looking down the rope into the closet below. For upper body workouts climb up the rope a few times each morning as your are getting dressed. You will be inspired by the echoes of you six grade gym coach in your brain.”


“View from closet up through the hull of the ship.”


“Steve Kuhl sits at the helm of the ship. The rope descends into the closet below for quick wardrobe changes.”

Kuhl Design Build website
via [the daily what]



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