London’s Harry Potter Museum Offers Behind-the-Scenes Peek


The Warner Brothers Studio Harry Potter Museum, located just outside of London, is a magical place where all of the real-life Harry Potter movie details can be explored and appreciated up close. Recently, Konstantin Shestakovsky took a trip to the museum, and was able to capture the magic and wonder of the movies in this collection of photographs.

A tour of the museum provides a behind-the-scenes look into the enchanting world of Harry Potter, and visitors can experience a first hand account of all of the authentic sets, props, costumes, and even animatronics from the films. Check out the Marauder’s Map, Harry’s wand, and the long dining tables to which fans have grown accustomed over the past decade of exciting cinema. The website says that the tour will “reveal some closely guarded secrets, including facts about the special effects and animatronics that made these films so hugely popular all over the world.”

As a bonus, if you decide to visit the London museum in the next few weeks (through January 6), you can expect to be greeted with much of the actual holiday decor that covered the Hogwarts’ halls during every Christmas scene in the films.























Harry Potter Museum London website



January 20, 2017

Floating Cabin Lets Nature-Lovers Sleep in the Treetops of Sweden

If you’ve ever dreamed of cuddling up in a contemporary treehouse, the 7th Room Treehotel may be your new favorite getaway. Designed by Snøhetta—a design office that dabbles in landscaping, architecture, interiors, and brand design—the floating bungalow is tucked away in Northern Sweden and perfectly positioned for a sweeping view of the Northern Lights. The 7th Room is elevated by twelve 10-meter stilts and is beautifully built around the towering trunk of a pine tree.

Read Article


January 20, 2017

19 Most Creative Water Fountains From Around the World

Water fountains have a long place in our history. Dating back to the Ancient Roman times, these reservoirs were first designed with a purely practical purpose—for holding precious drinking water and bathing. These early fountains were uncovered, free standing, and placed along the street for public consumption. (Wealthier folks also had them in their homes.)

Read Article


Get Our Weekly Newsletter