Historical Figures Transformed Into Modern Illustrations

William Shakespeare


A recent project commissioned by the UK’s history TV channel Yesterday has artists transforming historical portraits into modern day interpretations. The series is meant to celebrate the station’s new series, The Secret Life Of…, which is described as 14-part series that “lifts the lid on established and renowned superstars from history to reveal their secret lives.”

The episodes will cover the lives of Henry VIII, Queen Elizabeth I, Marie Antionette, and others with a tongue-in-cheek approach that will have viewers laughing and learning at the same time. Over the course of three months, each artist worked closely with history experts, and specifically Dr. Suzannah Lipscomb, to ensure that their 21st century portraits portrayed accurate details. The modern interpretations allow viewers to gain a bit of insight and understanding into the culture of the past by comparing social norms like wardrobe, make-up, and backgrounds to today’s world.


Marie Antoinette


Henry VIII


Admiral Lord Nelson


Elizabeth I

Yesterday website
via [Laughing Squid]



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