The Very Best Submissions of "You Had One Job!"

We’re all human and have made mistakes, however, some blunders are much funnier than others. You Had One Job! is a site dedicated to the meme by the same name that presents the various mistakes made by people who had a fairly simple task at hand. From mislabeling groceries and making it impossible for people to park their cars to assembling traffic lights and doors upside down, the site reveals some funny blunders due to human error.

There are recurring themes throughout the site’s growing photo gallery that most often include misspelled signs, misplaced structures, wrongly labeled products, packaging mixups, a direct defiance of legible commands, and TV screen captures of news segments where instructional text sits in place of necessary information like an interviewee’s name. One hilarious photo even exposes a network’s fumble in forgetting to replace “www. findoutwhatthewebsite’surlisandputithere.com” with an actual URL. Even though the photo bank for the series is like one long blooper reel and there are some face-palm moments, it’s sobering to know that we’re all capable of making simple mistakes and that we can laugh about it.





















You Had One Job! website
via [Laughing Squid]



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