Smiley Face Screws Bring Joy to Your D.I.Y. Projects


It's easy to overlook a screw. This ubiquitous object hasn't majorly changed in our lifetime, and you wouldn't expect it to. Well, forget the standard Phillips and flat-heads, because Japanese designer Yuma Kano created the Screw 🙂, a take on the universal product that has its head imprinted with a smiley face. Kano produced these tiny bolts in collaboration with the Komuro Seisakusho factory in East Osaka, Japan. He also designed a screwdriver with an identical grin that makes Screw 🙂 a viable option for do-it-yourself projects.

Kano wanted to infuse emotion into a small, everyday object. What better to use than a screw? It's industrial and utilitarian, and not something you'd expect to see smiling. Upon discovering this pleasant surprise, it inspires you to pass the joy along to others. We see this as the point of Kano's work. Screw:) is not entirely about how it functions, but if it brightens peoples’ lives with they use it.




Yuma Kano website
via [Lustik and Colossal]





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