Expressive Faces Emerge From Rotting Tree Trunks


In 2006, German artist duo Zonenkinder created The Tree Project, in which they embrace the gradual decay that occurs in everyday nature by transforming rotting tree wood into works of art. The artists enjoy finding new ways to create art through these inanimate objects, and they say, “We are constantly in search of new forms of expression and we love to play with unusual surfaces and locations.”

Comparable to the way we might look for faces and shapes in the clouds overhead, the couple sees all kinds of potential in the naturally formed timber. Once they find an inspiring blank canvas, they use biodegradable products to paint eyes, noses, and mouths across the surface of the wood, visually bringing new life to the hidden personalities of each tree. The final results of their endeavors are these extremely expressive faces which Zonenkinder believes “emphasize our close and unique connection with nature. Thereby reflecting that trees are exceptional and beautiful living individuals.” The ongoing project can be seen, until it gradually fades back into the earth, throughout the natural landscape of Denmark, Germany, and France. The various cute, playful, and grumpy faces would be quite the delightful surprise during a daily stroll through the trees!














Zonenkinder website
via [Wooster Collective]



January 20, 2017

Floating Cabin Lets Nature-Lovers Sleep in the Treetops of Sweden

If you’ve ever dreamed of cuddling up in a contemporary treehouse, the 7th Room Treehotel may be your new favorite getaway. Designed by Snøhetta—a design office that dabbles in landscaping, architecture, interiors, and brand design—the floating bungalow is tucked away in Northern Sweden and perfectly positioned for a sweeping view of the Northern Lights. The 7th Room is elevated by twelve 10-meter stilts and is beautifully built around the towering trunk of a pine tree.

Read Article


January 20, 2017

19 Most Creative Water Fountains From Around the World

Water fountains have a long place in our history. Dating back to the Ancient Roman times, these reservoirs were first designed with a purely practical purpose—for holding precious drinking water and bathing. These early fountains were uncovered, free standing, and placed along the street for public consumption. (Wealthier folks also had them in their homes.)

Read Article


Get Our Weekly Newsletter