Home / Design / StyleSide-By-Side Comparisons Reveal the Artistic Masterpieces Behind Modern Fashion

Side-By-Side Comparisons Reveal the Artistic Masterpieces Behind Modern Fashion

“La Mousme” by Vincent Van Gogh (1888) vs Jessica Chastain in Alexander McQueen for Vogue (2013)

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Fashion and art are intimately tied. Our visual culture is the amalgamation of influences, and clothing design regularly borrows from elements of past and contemporary art. Colors, texture, and the symbols seen in works—ranging from the Renaissance to present-day sculpture—all make their way into modern-day garments and the way they are styled. The Instagram account Art History Fashion highlights these connections by sharing side-by-side comparisons of the clothing and its source material (intentional or not).

The amount of fashion design inspiration taken from years, decades, and centuries past is striking—modern fashion clearly remixes art history. Some pieces, like Charles Robert Leslie’s 1838 painting Queen Victoria in Her Coronation Robes has seemed to directly inspire Rihanna’s headline-making dress from the 2015 Met Gala. Other comparisons are more subtle but still convey the essence of their origin. Jean Gabriel Domergue’s 20th-century painting Grand Gala includes a colorful floral frock that looks fashion-forward, even today. The same colors and shape of the flowers were mimicked in a 2012 collection from Jessica Hart and Pencey Standard Fall. Although the setting and pose between the painting and fashion photograph are different, the influence is clear.

Art History Fashion was found through our Instagram hashtag #MMMexplore. When posting your work on Instagram, be sure you tag us to share your work with us and our community!

The Instagram account Art History Fashion highlights fashion inspiration that's seemingly borrowed directly from works of art.

“Grand Gala” by Jean Gabriel Domergue (20th century) vs Jessica Hart x Pencey Standard Fall collection (2012)

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“The Birth of Venus” by Sandro Botticelli (~1486) vs De Beers campaign, featuring Lily Cole (2005)

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“The Corn Poppy” by Kees Van Dongen (1919) vs Otto Lucas in Vogue UK, photographed by Norman Parkinson (1959)

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Mosaic of Empress Theodora at the Church of San Vitale (547) vs Dolce & Gabbana Fall Ready to Wear (2013)

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“Ophelia” by John Everett Millais (1851-1852) vs “Ophelia Has A Dream” by Mihara Yasuhiro (2012)

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“The Burning Giraffe” by Salvador Dali (1937) vs Autumn/Winter womenswear by Maison Margiela (2016)

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“La Mousme” by Vincent Van Gogh (1888) vs Jessica Chastain in Alexander McQueen for Vogue (2013)

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“Portrait of Johanna Staude (unfinished)” by Gustav Klimt (1917-1918) vs L'Wren Scott “Allegory of Love” collection (2013)

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“Infinity Mirror Room – Phalli's Field” by Yayoi Kusama (1965) vs Louis Vuitton's Yayoi Kusama collection (2012)

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“Magie noire (Black Magic)” by René Magritte (1945) vs Andrew Matusik for GenLux Magazine (2008)

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“Face-Off” by Kevin Francis Gray (2007) vs Haider Ackermann in Vogue India (2012)

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“Nude in Apartment” by Roy Lichtenstein (1995) vs Ruth Knowles, photographed by Erwin Blumenfeld for Vogue (1949)

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Art History Fashion: Website | Instagram

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