Denmark’s Uniquely Shaped Geodesic Dome


This incredibly complex geometric structure by Copenhagen-based architects Kristoffer Tejlgaard and Benny Jepsen exemplifies the cooperative culmination of creative architecture, efficient design, and mathematic construction. The Danish architects built the geodesic dome for the Peoples Meeting being held in Bornholm, Denmark this year. The event gathers the greatest minds to discuss and debate the future of housing and according to the duo's client, BL, Denmark Public Housing, “a standard exhibition tent would not do justice to a debate of such importance.”

The architectural project, known simply as the Peoples Meeting Dome, provides a site-specific space that breaks down the traditional dome. Instead of walking into the mundane top-half of a giant ball, Tejlgaard and Jepsen have produced an aesthetically intriguing edifice with layers, niches, crevices, and corners. The dome boasts an intimate ambience with its central stage area and circumferential seating design surrounded by a pattern of triangular wooden modules and large windows.

Additionally, the space is column-free, allowing for more room and options for interior design, do to the structure's complex lattice design system that connects nodes of steel with wood. The project states, “The system is designed so that it is possible to vary the skeleton. It can be adapted to the given parameters, disassembled and placed in a new design, with new parameters.” The project also sought to be as environmentally conscious as possible. The frame is made with vary sizes of timber and plywood beams to minimize material consumption. All of the interiors, facades, and flooring were made with locally sourced pine.
















Kristoffer Tejlgaard on Behance
Benny Jepson on Behance
Peoples Meeting Dome on Archello
via [designboom]

Pinar

Pinar Noorata is the Managing Editor at My Modern Met. She is a writer, editor, and content creator based in Brooklyn, NY. She earned her BA in Film and Media Studies from CUNY Hunter College and is an alumni of the Center for Arts Education’s Career Development Program in NYC. She has worked at NBC Universal, Penguin Books, and the Tribeca Film Festival as well as many other independent media companies. When she isn’t writing, editing, or creating videos herself, Pinar enjoys watching movies—anything from foreign art house films to mainstream blockbusters.
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