Capturing the Boom of Skateboarding in the 1960s

Photojournalist Bill Eppridge captures skateboarding’s humble beginnings in the urban setting of New York City. While the concept of the sport and makeshift models of the skateboard were introduced sometime in the 40s or 50s, it was in the mid-1960s that skateboarding truly flourished and Eppridge was there to catch it in all its glory for a lifestyle spread in LIFE Magazine.

In his series titled Skateboarding in New York City, Eppridge exhibits the joy and excitement of zooming down a city street and playfully riding past pedestrians on a thin, wheeled board, as clearly evidenced through the skateboarders’ beaming faces. The exhilarating rush that each child, teen, and adult is feeling as they sweep through the city translates through each photo, giving us all a sense of that cool and carefree fun from simpler times. Skateboarding was not yet an athletic career path or the subject of video gaming franchises. It was clearly just a fun thing to do with your friends in the streets of New York City.



















via [Building a Wolf, LIFE]





December 2, 2016

Sexy French Farmers Pose for Shirtless 2017 Calendar

Last year, the holiday season was set ablaze by France’s Pompiers Sans Frontières (Firefighters Without Borders) and their sizzling, stripped-down calendar. Shot for a good cause by renowned Paris-based fashion photographer Fred Goudon, the risqué calendar proved to be a popular Christmas gift—both in France and abroad. In keeping with tradition, Goudon has photographed a new crop of au naturel pin-up models for his 2018 edition: French farmers.

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December 1, 2016

Meticulous Landscape Paintings Beautifully Represent Intangible Emotional States

Artist Crystal Liu intimately ties her emotional states to beautiful abstract paintings. In large-scale works, she constructs landscapes that are metaphors for the intangible forces that drive us. Visually, elements of the Earth and sky are the actors for the feelings we cannot easily imagine. Together, the sun, mountains, and more depict “narratives of conflict, entrapment, longing, and precarious hope.” These symbols allow Liu to seem removed, yet make the pieces deeply personal.

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