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August 21, 2018

This 4,000-Year-Old Tablet Could Be the World’s Oldest Customer Service Complaint

This Babylonian tablet from 1750 BC goes to show that customer service and client/vendor disputes were happening well before shopping malls and Amazon. The clay tablet comes from the ancient city of Ur, now part of southern Iraq, and is part of the British Museum‘s collection. Though it's just 4.5 inches (11.6 cm) tall and about 2 inches (5 cm) wide, the complaint is rather detailed.

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August 21, 2018

This Exquisite “Underground Cathedral” Has Been Carved Entirely Out of Salt

When you imagine places of worship, traditional structures like Gothic churches, colorful mosques, and dazzling Buddhist temples likely come to mind. If you've ever visited Wieliczka, Poland, however, you know that not all holy buildings follow this formula. In fact, some—like the the “underground cathedral” in the Wieliczka Salt Mine—aren't buildings at all! Nestled over 1,000 feet below the Polish town, this subterranean shrine dates back to the Middle Ages.

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August 20, 2018

30 Million-Year-Old Praying Mantis Is Preserved in Pristine Piece of Amber

Embedded within a clear piece of amber, a small praying mantis sits at attention, frozen forever in time. The piece, which measures just slightly over one inch tall, was sold via Heritage Auctions for $6,000 in 2016. The pristine piece of amber, which comes from the Dominican Republic, gives a rare view of this incredible mantis. The amber itself derives from the extinct Hymenaea protera, a prehistoric leguminous tree.

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August 20, 2018

Underwater Photographer Spends 20 Years Capturing Photos of Microscopic Plankton

Japanese underwater photographer Ryo Minemizu has dedicated his 20-year career to capturing some of the smallest organisms in the sea—plankton. Shooting primarily in the shadow of Mount Fuji in the Osezaki sea, Minemizu goes deep underwater to discover the beauty and diversity of these microscopic creatures. His dedication sees him spending two to eight hours underwater every day, where he sets about photographing these tiny organisms.

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