Design

May 26, 2020

Designers Create Hands-Free Pedestrian Crossings to Lessen the Spread of Germs

As the world continues to grapple with the coronavirus, more and more designers are using their skills to help keep us safe. From new ways to open doors to concepts for air travel, design is paving a new normal for what post-Covid life will look like. As we remain more conscious about what we touch and the germs we’re spreading, even small things like pedestrian crossings become a point of contamination.

Read Article


May 25, 2020

Redbubble Is Having a Big Sale on Their Artist-Decorated Cloth Face Masks

As places begin to slowly reopen, it’s important we take the necessary steps for responsible social distancing. Part of that includes wearing face masks in public, especially when maintaining six feet of space is hard to do—like in the grocery store or pharmacy. Luckily, artists have made it easy to wear masks by putting their artwork on them. In doing this, they’re making the cloth coverings both practical and fashionable.

Read Article


May 23, 2020

Illustrated Floor Plans Feature Architecture and Set Design of Beloved Films

Artist Boryana Ilieva examines film architecture and set design in her project Floor Plan Croissant. This ongoing series of meticulously painted floor plans capture the cinematic spaces of famous films like Parasite (2019), Roma (2018), and Call Me By Your Name (2017). The idea for the series began after Ilieva attended a lecture in 2014 by Finnish architect Juhani Pallasmaa.

Read Article


May 22, 2020

Crayola Launches ‘Colors of the World’ Crayon Set to Represent 40 Different Skin Tones

Kids’ art materials don’t always allow for children to accurately depict diversity when drawing people, leaving many feeling unrepresented. That’s why Crayola recently announced a set of new crayons called Colors of the World. This inclusive set features 40 different skin tones, representing a full spectrum of human complexions. Working with real people to develop each shade, Crayola started with the lightest and darkest hues as starting points.

Read Article