Technology

August 11, 2017

Adobe Presents: An Evening with Pete Souza at the Metropolitan Museum of Art

For eight years, during President Barack Obama’s two terms in office, photographer Pete Souza served as the official White House photographer. He captured the President’s every move. Every meeting, every overseas trip, every historic event—Souza was there with camera in tow, ready to document an undoubtedly significant presidency in U.S. history. Whether you realized it or not, all those memorable and now-iconic photos of President Obama were taken by Souza.

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June 26, 2017

Magnetic Drill Lets You Easily Build Furniture Without Any Visible Holes

Woodworkers, rejoice! A new magnetic drill now makes it possible to have seamless joints with the holding power of screws. The Invis Mx2 attaches to any standard drill, making it possible to create aesthetically pleasing, stable furniture with ease. Once the magnetic screwdriver works its magic, you can screw and unscrew connections easily, with minimal wear and tear. The innovative system cuts out the need for special clamps and the wait time for glue to dry.

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June 23, 2017

Volkswagen Brings Back the Beloved Microbus as an Electric Vehicle

Are we getting one step closer to having the beloved Volkswagen Microbus back in production? All signs point in the right direction, with VW CEO Herbert Diess' recent statements. “Emotional cars are very important for the brand,” he shared. “We are selling loads of Beetles still, particularly in US markets. But we will also have the Microbus that we showed, which we have recently decided we will build.

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May 11, 2017

Behind the Scenes: How the British Library Digitizes One of the World’s Biggest Books

Until just 5 years ago, The Klencke Atlas—a collection of maps named after Johannes Klencke, a key figure in the 17th century Dutch sugar trade—remained the world's biggest book. Housed in the British Library‘s cartographic collection and composed in 1660, the large-scale book has fascinated bibliophiles and map enthusiasts for centuries. While access to the atlas has been limited in the past, it has recently undergone a digitization project that now allows anyone to virtually leaf through its pages.

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