New Striking Self Portraits by Kyle Thompson


Chicago-based photographer Kyle Thompson wowed us with his surreal self-portraits nine months ago and he hasn’t quit churning out striking photos yet. The 21-year-old has been on a roll, introducing one compelling shot after another for his own ambitious 365 photo project. Having just recently completed his year-long visual journey, we felt we needed to share more of the young photographer’s newest works since we last saw him.

Thompson continues to play with the elements–submerging himself in lakes and muddy puddles, exposing random limbs poking out from the earth, and setting himself on fire. His images have a beautiful sense of movement to them, especially in the recurring presentation of the fluidity of windswept fabric, which often complements his serene expression. Many of the photographer’s images alternate between presenting a visual interpretation of inhaling a breath of fresh air and being suffocated by some unnatural force. However, both of these approaches offer something surreally exquisite.













Kyle Thompson website
Kyle Thompson on Flickr





December 7, 2016

Mom Prepares Healthy Meals as Cartoon Characters for Son to Eat

Getting pint-sized, picky eaters to finish their fruits and vegetables can be a tricky task for many parents. For food artist Laleh Mohmedi, however, it’s a piece of cake. Using healthy ingredients and a bit of creativity, the Melbourne mom dishes out meals inspired by her 4-year-old son’s favorite animated characters. From expressive Pixar monsters to a spot-on Spongebob Squarepants, Mohmedi reproduces a range of beloved childhood icons out of meat, pasta, and other dinner staples.

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December 7, 2016

Beautiful Vintage Light Bulbs Feature Luminous Floral Filaments

LED light bulbs are all the rage nowadays, but you can’t beat the timeless beauty of vintage filaments. Between the late 1930s and into the 1970s, the Aerolux Light Corporation produced novelty bulbs with tiny sculptures inside. These decorative filaments take the shapes of flowers and birds which are electrically illuminated in a variety of vibrant colors. To construct these bulbs, Aerolux used low-pressure gas in their filaments—either neon, argon, or both.

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