Solar Panel Roads Will Produce Power for the Energy Grid


By simply driving your car, you could power the energy grid. Sound crazy? American electrical engineer Scott Brusaw is trying to make it a reality with his system of solar-powered roads. The idea, which he is calling Solar Roadways, is to re-purpose the national highways using photovoltaic panels. Vehicles would drive on the "smart streets" and generate electricity to light up the country.

When he first began this endeavor years ago, Bursaw saw a lot of support from companies like Google and General Electric. He's since moved on from the first prototyping stage and has further developed the project as a modular photovoltaic paving system. It can withstand trucks that weigh up to 264,500 pounds, and this means that the solar road panels would be installed on highways, parking lots, driveways, sidewalks, and even playgrounds.

To test the panels, they’ve been installed in a small parking lot. It includes the solar cells, LED lighting, heating elements, and a textured glass surface. If you want to support the project, check out Solar Roadway's campaign on Indiegogo.






Solar Roadways website and Indiegogo page
via [designboom]



January 17, 2017

Giant 12-Foot Alligator Casually Crosses Paths with Tourists in Florida

Imagine visiting Lakeland, Florida and seeing this creature cross your path! Over the weekend, a giant alligator strolled past a group of tourists at a local nature center—apparently unaware of his awe-inspiring size. As the reptile sauntered along, it ignored the small group of people who quickly drew their cameras to capture the incredible sight. Bystander Kim Joiner managed to film the alligator while it trekked the grassy path.

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January 16, 2017

Powerful Portraits Capture the History and Masculinity of Mongolian Wrestling

“Like going to war.” This is how one of the wrestlers in photographer Ken Hermann and art director Gem Fletcher‘s project Bökh, describes Mongolian wrestling. Shot in the grasslands of Inner Mongolia, the resulting portraits and short film pay respect to this ancient tradition. It’s a tradition that is still very much alive in the nomadic communities that account for 30% of the country’s population.

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