New Photography Technique Reflects Themes of Anxiety

Gellage is a series by Czech photographer Michal Macku named after an intricate technique he developed. The term “gellage”–essentially a portmanteau of “collage” and “gelatin”–refers to a process that involves “the transfer of exposed and fixed photographic emulsion onto paper.” Macku’s experimental practice takes liberties in moving the gelatinous emulsion on film negatives around, thereby altering the resulting image that gets printed in the dark room.

In the end, the innovative photographer’s technique has produced a brilliant series of portraits that seem to be shredding themselves through the page. The artist’s meticulous manipulation presents the naked human form, often the photographer himself, as an expressive figure attacking and ripping itself apart. There are heavy themes of anxiety, depression, self-hate, and self-harm reflected in the powerful works.






Michal Macku website
via [arpeggia]





December 2, 2016

Sexy French Farmers Pose for Shirtless 2017 Calendar

Last year, the holiday season was set ablaze by France’s Pompiers Sans Frontières (Firefighters Without Borders) and their sizzling, stripped-down calendar. Shot for a good cause by renowned Paris-based fashion photographer Fred Goudon, the risqué calendar proved to be a popular Christmas gift—both in France and abroad. In keeping with tradition, Goudon has photographed a new crop of au naturel pin-up models for his 2018 edition: French farmers.

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December 1, 2016

Meticulous Landscape Paintings Beautifully Represent Intangible Emotional States

Artist Crystal Liu intimately ties her emotional states to beautiful abstract paintings. In large-scale works, she constructs landscapes that are metaphors for the intangible forces that drive us. Visually, elements of the Earth and sky are the actors for the feelings we cannot easily imagine. Together, the sun, mountains, and more depict “narratives of conflict, entrapment, longing, and precarious hope.” These symbols allow Liu to seem removed, yet make the pieces deeply personal.

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