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Budapest Buildings Transformed into Street Corners with Striking Symmetry

Digital Collage Architecture Photography

Photographer Zsolt Hlinka creates imaginary places out of real architectural forms. His latest series called Corner Symmetry features intersecting buildings in Budapest that have been split in half and mirrored in the center of the composition. The result produces an extreme perspective of a stunning cityscape, where the top of the structures are angled at 45 degrees.  Because of this, it seems like we’re viewing them through a fisheye lens—but it’s really a meticulously crafted digital collage.

With much of Hlinka’s abstract architecture photography, we can’t help but think these buildings are real. It’s only after we’ve spent time with each picture that we realize they’re two halves of the same whole. This momentary confusion is all Hlinka’s design. “Buildings keep more of their surroundings with them, so the illusion becomes even more realistic,” he writes. “However, no matter which side of these familiar looking buildings do we start our inspection first, we will always end up on the same points.”

Corner Symmetry expands on Hlinka’s earlier project called Urban Symmetry. For that series, he digitally manipulated straight-on views of buildings to create harmonious reflections against similarly monochromatic backgrounds. They have a distinctly Wes Anderson feel that’s both whimsical yet curious—leaving us wondering what’s behind the doors of these isolated structures.

Zsolt Hlinka uses digital collage to construct his abstract architecture photography.

Digital Collage Architecture Photography Digital Collage Architecture Photography

Each half of the building has been mirrored, creating a curious composition that you might believe is real—at first.

Digital Collage Architecture Photography Abstract Architecture Photography by Zslot Hlinka Digital Collage Architecture Photography

“No matter which side of these familiar looking buildings do we start our inspection first,” Hlinka writes, “we will always end up on the same points.”

Digital Collage Architecture Photography Abstract Architecture Photography by Zslot Hlinka Abstract Architecture Photography by Zslot Hlinka Abstract Architecture Photography by Zslot Hlinka

Zsolt Hlinka: Website | Facebook | Instagram | Behance

My Modern Met granted permission to use images by Zsolt Hlinka.

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