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Photographer Captures Stunning Symmetry of Berlin’s Interior Architecture

Berlin interior architecture photography

Hohenzollernplatz Church

Self-taught photographer Thibaud Poirier points and shoots his camera at the interiors of Berlin’s most stunning buildings in his new series, Berlin Interiors. Each photograph in the series is perfectly framed to exaggerate the interior architecture’s symmetry to great effect. The result is a collection that can be interpreted as an ode to lines, cubes, and curves, as much as highlighting beautiful interiors.

Poirier is Parisian, but has called Buenos Aires, Houston, Montreal, and Tokyo home, making him a man of the world. Exposure to different city dynamics certainly informs his work. “Growing up in these vastly different landscapes and cultures, early on I developed a love and fascination for architecture and urban environments,” he shares. “As a self taught photographer my focus is to capture the beauty and energy of these places as I see them.”

His unique vision of Berlin’s interiors will have you seeing space in a different way. Every frame takes a peek into the heart of these buildings, leaving the viewer mesmerized.

The symmetry of Berlin’s interiors is hypnotic.

Berlin interior architecture photography

Jacob and Wilhelm Grimm Center

Berlin interior architecture photography

Haus Des Rundfunks

Berlin interior architecture photography

HTW Berlin

Berlin interior architecture photography

Ludwig Erhard Haus

Berlin interior architecture photography

Berlin Crematorium

Berlin interior architecture photography

Berlin Crematorium

Thibaud Poirier: Website | Facebook | Instagram | Behance
h/t: [The Khooll]

All images via Thibaud Poirier.

Jessica Stewart

Jessica Stewart is a Contributing Writer and Digital Media Specialist for My Modern Met, as well as a curator and art historian. She earned her MA in Renaissance Studies from University College London and now lives in Rome, Italy. She cultivated expertise in street art which led to the purchase of her photographic archive by the Treccani Italian Encyclopedia in 2014. When she’s not spending time with her three dogs, she also manages the studio of a successful street artist. In 2013, she authored the book 'Street Art Stories Roma' and most recently contributed to 'Crossroads: A Glimpse Into the Life of Alice Pasquini'. You can follow her adventures online at @romephotoblog.

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