Artist Hides Giant Wooden Troll Sculptures in Western Australia for Everyone To Find

There is magic to be found in the wilderness. You just have to know where to look! Artist Thomas Dambo is doing his part to make the world a bit more enchanting by spreading his incredible troll sculptures throughout the world. His monumental gentle giants are constructed using recycled wood, branches, and other debris, and they are in forests and along shores just waiting for anyone to find them. Once discovered, their calm demeanor and jovial expressions add delight alongside the surprise of coming upon the larger-than-life fantastical forms.

Dambo’s work spans multiple continents, and his latest collection of trolls was recently constructed in the Peel region of Western Australia. It’s part of Giants of Mandurah, and he’s installed six different trolls throughout the area. Their varying locations have been made into a game and invite visitors to explore the surrounding nature as they try to find them all.

Each sculpture has a different pose that corresponds to its site. One troll sits quietly on the shores overlooking the water while another grips a tree in a forest setting. They all have Dambo’s trademark kind eyes and large smiles and accompany a special symbol that helps visitors complete the game. Once someone collects the symbols and breaks the code, it leads them to another “secret” troll.

Created with children in mind, the hide-and-seek aspect was an important element of the project. “I think it’s really important that the next generation is connected to nature,” Dambo explained. “You can’t isolate all the humans in a city and believe they are going to care about the natural world. That’s why I tried to gamify the giants, to appeal to younger people who are so used to discovering the world through a screen.”

Sadly, one of the six trolls in Giants of Mandurah has been destroyed by a fire. The sculptures can take up to 750 hours to complete and represent the hard work of the artist and a team of volunteers, so the loss is a devastating one. The remaining trolls will be on view until November 2023.

If you’re not local to Peel, there might be a chance to see one of Dambo’s trolls where you live. His Trollmap plots all of the places where you can find his work.

Artist Thomas Dambo is doing his part to make the world a bit more enchanting by spreading his incredible troll sculptures throughout the world.

 

View this post on Instagram

 

A post shared by Officially Perth (@officially_perth)

His latest collection of trolls was recently constructed in the Peel region of Western Australia.

 

View this post on Instagram

 

A post shared by Kim Thompson (@realjiveturkey)

It’s part of Giants of Mandurah, and he’s installed six different trolls throughout the area.

 

View this post on Instagram

 

A post shared by Kim Thompson (@realjiveturkey)

 

View this post on Instagram

 

A post shared by Destination Perth (@destinationperth)

Their varying locations have been made into a game and invite visitors to explore the surrounding nature as they try to find them all.

 

View this post on Instagram

 

A post shared by Officially Perth (@officially_perth)

Once someone collects the symbols and breaks the code, it leads them to another “secret” troll.

 

View this post on Instagram

 

A post shared by Rhiannan Sheridan (@boomboxrhi)

The trolls will be on view until November 2023.

 

View this post on Instagram

 

A post shared by Kingsley Flett (@kingsleyflett)

Thomas Dambo: Website | Instagram | Facebook
h/t: [Good News Network]

Related Articles:

Recycling Artist Sculpts 7 Giant Friendly Trolls to Take Over a Forest in Belgium

Giant Wooden Trolls Make Mischief in an Enchanting Outdoor Museum

Fantastical Wooden Sculptures Act as Symbols of Compassion

Giant Troll Sculptures Made of Recycled Wood Greet Visitors in the Great Outdoors

Sara Barnes

Sara Barnes is a Staff Editor at My Modern Met, Manager of My Modern Met Store, and co-host of the My Modern Met Top Artist Podcast. As an illustrator and writer living in Seattle, she chronicles illustration, embroidery, and beyond through her blog Brown Paper Bag and Instagram @brwnpaperbag. She wrote a book about embroidery artist Sarah K. Benning titled 'Embroidered Life' that was published by Chronicle Books in 2019. Sara is a graduate of the Maryland Institute College of Art. She earned her BFA in Illustration in 2008 and MFA in Illustration Practice in 2013.
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