21 Unforgettable Examples of Land Art

Starting May 27 and continuing until September 3, 2012, the Museum of Contemporary Art (or MOCA) in Los Angeles will be presenting Ends of the Earth: Land Art to 1974, the first large-scale, historical-thematic exhibition to deal broadly with land art. There will be works by more than 80 artists from all around the world including Japan, Israel, Iceland and Europe.

To help celebrate, we’ve put together a list of our very favorite pieces of land art, some of which have already been featured here on My Modern Met, as well as others that you may be seeing for the first time. What makes this art movement stand out from the rest is that natural materials are all used, and often these works are site specific, meaning they’re designed for a particular location. From Nils-Udo’s giant nest to Cornelia Konrads’ impossibly amazing sculptures, here, then, are 21 unforgettable examples of land art.

Above by Nils-Udo

 


Andy Goldsworthy


Andy Goldsworthy


Andy Goldsworthy


Sylvian Meyer


Richard Shilling


Walter Mason


Jim Denevan


Robert Smithson


Andrew Rogers


Andrew Rogers


Sylvian Meyer


Andrew Goldsworthy


Cornelia Konrads


Andrew Goldsworthy


Mikael Hansen


Andrew Goldsworthy


Cornelia Konrads


Sonja Hinrichsen


Simon Beck


Simon Beck





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Sexy French Farmers Pose for Shirtless 2017 Calendar

Last year, the holiday season was set ablaze by France’s Pompiers Sans Frontières (Firefighters Without Borders) and their sizzling, stripped-down calendar. Shot for a good cause by renowned Paris-based fashion photographer Fred Goudon, the risqué calendar proved to be a popular Christmas gift—both in France and abroad. In keeping with tradition, Goudon has photographed a new crop of au naturel pin-up models for his 2018 edition: French farmers.

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December 1, 2016

Meticulous Landscape Paintings Beautifully Represent Intangible Emotional States

Artist Crystal Liu intimately ties her emotional states to beautiful abstract paintings. In large-scale works, she constructs landscapes that are metaphors for the intangible forces that drive us. Visually, elements of the Earth and sky are the actors for the feelings we cannot easily imagine. Together, the sun, mountains, and more depict “narratives of conflict, entrapment, longing, and precarious hope.” These symbols allow Liu to seem removed, yet make the pieces deeply personal.

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