Digital Art Masterpieces – Ray Caesar (15 pieces)


Ray Caesar’s digital art is some of the best I’ve ever seen. His pieces almost look like paintings due to their unique emotional impact and seamless blending, but each piece is exclusively created using a 3D modeling software called Maya.

Some of Caesar’s artistic inspiration came from working for 17 years in the Art and Photography Department of The Hospital For Sick Children in Toronto. Ray documented things such as child abuse, surgical reconstruction, psychology and animal research. The artist explains, "I often awake in the middle of the night and realize I have been wondering the hallways and corridors of the giant hospital. It is clear to me that this is the birthplace of all my imagery".

His images are classical, yet at the same time very contemporary. His figures are otherworldly – a beautiful fusion of sci-fi fantasy, lush landscapes, and Victorian sensibilities. Born in London, England on October 26 1958, Caesar currently lives in Toronto, Canada.


Ray Caesar’s website





December 2, 2016

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Last year, the holiday season was set ablaze by France’s Pompiers Sans Frontières (Firefighters Without Borders) and their sizzling, stripped-down calendar. Shot for a good cause by renowned Paris-based fashion photographer Fred Goudon, the risqué calendar proved to be a popular Christmas gift—both in France and abroad. In keeping with tradition, Goudon has photographed a new crop of au naturel pin-up models for his 2018 edition: French farmers.

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