Massive Fabric Sculpture is Life-Size Home within Home

One of our favorite contemporary artists has just come out with his largest work to date. Do Ho Suh is a Korean sculptor and installation artist who’s known for his thought-provoking sculptures that often have to do with migration and personal space. These themes reflect his own move from his homeland of Seoul, South Korea to New York.

At the National Museum of Modern and Contemporary Art (MMCA) in Seoul, you’ll find Home Within Home Within Home Within Home Within Home, a 1:1 scale replica of two houses the artist had previously lived in, one inside the other. Created in purple fabric, his traditional Korean home, where he lived in when he was a child, is enveloped and suspended within a more modern building, his first apartment building when he came to the United States, located in Providence, Rhode Island.

The work is so massive, measuring 12m x 15m, that Suh had to use a 3D scanning machine for precision and detail. While you see two homes in this piece, Suh calls it Home Within Home Within Home Within Home Within Home because he wants the viewer to see the installation on a larger level. “As you approach the gallery space, my translucent piece is between the viewer and the longer view, so it becomes five homes-within-homes: my two homes inside; the museum; the palace; and then Seoul.”






You can see and even walk through this installation at the MMCA until May 5, 2014.

MMCA website
via [Wallpaper]





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