Native Dogs Represented as World Cup Soccer Players

With their love of chasing balls and running in packs, dogs would no doubt love to participate in the 2014 World Cup. Animal photography website Life on White imagined what they'd look like if they suited up, and placed different breeds' heads onto team jerseys. Each pairing of dog and uniform corresponds to the canine's country of origin, like the Shiba Inu in Japan or the German Shepherd in Deutschland. In every image, these players look like they are ready to take the field, score some goals, and make their country proud.

This clever series is great promotion for the upcoming competition in June and July. You have to wonder, though, that while soccer fans are no doubt fiercely loyal to their team, pet owners are equally as loyal to their favorite breed. What if you loved the dalmatian, for instance, but didn’t want to root for Greece? Who would you cheer for? With this type of conundrum, maybe it's best we leave the professional sports to the dogs' owners.










Life on White Creative website
via [Fubiz]



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