Mind-Blowing Toothpick Sculptures


Scott Weaver is truly the definition of perseverance. 35 years ago he began his work on Rolling Through the Bay, an insanely complex kinetic sculpture made entirely of toothpicks! Weaver's elaborate sculpture is made up of multiple "tours" that have pingpong balls moving through the iconic symbols of San Francisco. He has spent well over 3,000 hours on this project.

Weaver uses different brands of toothpicks depending on what he’s building and enlists the help of his friends and family members to collect toothpicks for him when they travel. “Some of the trees in Golden Gate Park are made from toothpicks from Kenya, Morocco, Spain, West Germany and Italy,” he says. “The heart inside the Palace of Fine Arts is made out of toothpicks people threw at our wedding." This is one sculpture that must be seen in person to appreciate its full awesomeness. It is at the Tinkering Studio until the end of June, so check it out if you can!







Scott Weaver’s website
via [This is Colossal]



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