Beautiful 3-Hour Sand Drawings Created with Only a Rake

We just love Simon Beck’s sensational snow art, in which he spends days walking in special snowshoes to create spectacular patterns, and so, we couldn’t resist these equally amazing geometric designs in the sand. England-based artist Tony Plant has been creating what he describes as ethereal work for more than twenty years. He interacts with the environment by painting rocks, making tracks through the snow, and dying water, and he then leaves the projects behind to be washed away and erased back into nature.

These sand drawings are another example of this temporary art. To create each drawing, Plant spends hours on the coastline, using a rake to form lines and circles in the sand. The geometric designs do not last long, very quickly getting washed away by the waves or walked across by surfers and beach-goers. Each fleeting artwork is a site-specific project that the artist has no control over and he says, “I just think of them as non-precious things. Some people get confused about why I do it, when there’s nothing left after the tide has washed everything away, but I just see it as a new blank canvas for me to work with.”









Tony Plant’s website
via [Faith Is Torment]



January 20, 2017

Floating Cabin Lets Nature-Lovers Sleep in the Treetops of Sweden

If you’ve ever dreamed of cuddling up in a contemporary treehouse, the 7th Room Treehotel may be your new favorite getaway. Designed by Snøhetta—a design office that dabbles in landscaping, architecture, interiors, and brand design—the floating bungalow is tucked away in Northern Sweden and perfectly positioned for a sweeping view of the Northern Lights. The 7th Room is elevated by twelve 10-meter stilts and is beautifully built around the towering trunk of a pine tree.

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January 20, 2017

19 Most Creative Water Fountains From Around the World

Water fountains have a long place in our history. Dating back to the Ancient Roman times, these reservoirs were first designed with a purely practical purpose—for holding precious drinking water and bathing. These early fountains were uncovered, free standing, and placed along the street for public consumption. (Wealthier folks also had them in their homes.)

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