Funny Cardboard Signs Express the Thoughts of Lost Objects


Most pedestrians simply walk past the used, abandoned, and broken things found along the streets of New York City. But, not graphic designer Yoonjin Lee! As she navigates through the city, the senior at the School of Visual Arts finds clever ways to give personality to a variety of small, inanimate objects in her series, Little Lost Project.

The artist constructs tiny cardboard signs that create a voice for the discarded stuff and convey messages like “Help! I’m lost!” and “You’d think a ‘pair of gloves’ would be together forever…I am useless now.” The poor little objects hold the signs up along the sidewalks and, if passers-by happen to take a second glance, they will discover the sadness a lost lighter or a dropped metro card might “feel” when it discovers it no longer has a purpose.

The artist explains, “Losing your phone can ruin your day for sure but how about losing your favorite lip balm that you always keep in your pocket? It is definitely annoying but you can easily buy a new one. Ever wonder where and what these little objects are doing now?”












Yoonjin Lee’s website
Little Lost Project website
via [Laughing Squid]



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