Home / EnvironmentCosta Rica Pledges to Ban All Single-Use Plastics by 2021 in Bold Stance Against Pollution

Costa Rica Pledges to Ban All Single-Use Plastics by 2021 in Bold Stance Against Pollution

Costa Rica is taking a firm stance against plastic pollution. Already known for its incredible work in reversing deforestation in the country, they are now tackling the issue of single-use plastic and the waste it causes. In fact, by 2021 Costa Rica has pledged to ban all single-use plastics.

While everywhere from New Dehli to California has passed legislation banning plastic bags and disposables, the Costa Rica pledge is quite ambitious. Plastic lids, coffee stirrers, and disposable cutlery are all on the chopping block in the Central American country as it aims to move toward being a carbon neutral nation. When you consider that 4,000 tons of solid waste is produced in the country per year, and 20% of that never makes it to a recycling center or landfill—ending up in rivers, on beaches, and in forests—it’s a necessary action.

Costa Rica is aiming to ban all single-use plastics by the year 2021.

So how does Costa Rica plan to meet their lofty goal in such a short time?

The government is leading a multi-strategy effort that will involve both private and public sectors. This includes incentives and innovative research for the replacement of the plastic products. In fact, things are already underway with Costa Rican researchers experimenting with plastic alternatives. A group of university students has been working on a material made out of bananas that looks to be 5 times stronger than plastic and would disintegrate in just 18 months.

Let’s see if other countries follow Costa Rica’s bold lead into reducing the amount of plastic waste that goes out into the environment.

h/t: [Inhabitat, The Costa Rica News]

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Jessica Stewart

Jessica Stewart is a Contributing Writer and Digital Media Specialist for My Modern Met, as well as a curator and art historian. She earned her MA in Renaissance Studies from University College London and now lives in Rome, Italy. She cultivated expertise in street art which led to the purchase of her photographic archive by the Treccani Italian Encyclopedia in 2014. When she’s not spending time with her three dogs, she also manages the studio of a successful street artist. In 2013, she authored the book 'Street Art Stories Roma' and most recently contributed to 'Crossroads: A Glimpse Into the Life of Alice Pasquini'. You can follow her adventures online at @romephotoblog.

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