Learn How to Draw a Bat Flying in the Sky Step by Step

Giant Indian Fruit Bat

Giant Indian Fruit Bat (Photo: OndrejProsicky/DepositPhotos)

Bats are often regarded as a symbol of Halloween and all things spooky. However, there's more to this nocturnal creature than its haunting reputation. For instance, they are the only mammal in the world capable of flight, and, as pollinators, they are vital members of the ecosystem.

Follow along to learn how to draw a bat flying through the sky. All you'll need to get started is a pencil, an eraser, a pen, and some paper. Ready to give it a shot? Then, let's draw a bat!

Learn How to Draw a Bat Flying in the Sky Step by Step

 

Step 1: Draw a circle

How to Draw a Bat Step by Step

Photo & Art: Margherita Cole | My Modern Met

Lightly sketch a circle.

 

Step 2: Add the snout 

How to Draw a Bat Step by Step

Photo & Art: Margherita Cole | My Modern Met

Next, attach a half-oval to the circle to create the bat's snout.

 

Step 3: Draw the ear and face

How to Draw a Bat Step by Step

Photo & Art: Margherita Cole | My Modern Met

Afterward, you can sketch a triangle-shaped ear to the top of the circle and draw one oval eye above the snout. Then, add a rounded line inside the snout to create the mouth.

How to Draw a Bat Step by Step

Photo & Art: Margherita Cole | My Modern Met

 

Step 4: Sketch the body

How to Draw a Bat Step by Step

Photo & Art: Margherita Cole | My Modern Met

Next, attach the circle to a long oval—this will be the body of the bat.

 

Step 5: Add the legs and feet

How to Draw a Bat Step by Step

Photo & Art: Margherita Cole | My Modern Met

Now, sketch a pair of thin rectangular legs to the bottom of the bat's body, and complete them with two rectangular feet.

How to Draw a Bat Step by Step

Photo & Art: Margherita Cole | My Modern Met

Step 6: Start the wing

How to Draw a Bat Step by Step

Photo & Art: Margherita Cole | My Modern Met

Bat wings are fairly complex, but it's easiest if you take it slowly. So, starting just below the head, sketch a long arch-like line.

 

Step 7: Continue the wing

How to Draw a Bat Step by Step

Photo & Art: Margherita Cole | My Modern Met

Move your pencil to the foot of the bat and draw a similarly arched line bending in the opposite direction.

 

Step 8: Continue the wing

How to Draw a Bat Step by Step

Photo & Art: Margherita Cole | My Modern Met

Stay at the bottom of the wing and sketch two more arched lines in decreasing size.

 

Step 9: Finish the wing

How to Draw a Bat Step by Step

Photo & Art: Margherita Cole | My Modern Met

Complete the wing with two more lines. Compare your sketch with some reference photos to make sure you're satisfied with the result.

 

Step 10: Sketch the other wing

How to Draw a Bat Step by Step

Photo & Art: Margherita Cole | My Modern Met

Begin the other wing by drawing one straight line extending from the neck and one arched line extending from the other foot.

 

Step 11: Complete the other wing

How to Draw a Bat Step by Step

Photo & Art: Margherita Cole | My Modern Met

Finish the wing using the same techniques and shapes used in the first one.

 

Step 12: Sketch the upper arm

How to Draw a Bat Step by Step

Photo & Art: Margherita Cole | My Modern Met

Now that we've drawn the outline of the bat's wings, it's time to flesh them out. So, attach a rounded triangle to the body of the bat, just inside the wing. This will be the upper arm.

 

Step 13: Continue the arm

How to Draw a Bat Step by Step

Photo & Art: Margherita Cole | My Modern Met

Now, add a long forearm ending just below the first point at the top of the wing. There, draw a short finger portruding from the wing with a long, sharp nail.

How to Draw a Bat Step by Step

Photo & Art: Margherita Cole | My Modern Met

 

Step 14: Add the rest of the fingers

How to Draw a Bat Step by Step

Photo & Art: Margherita Cole | My Modern Met

Next, add the other four fingers. These should extend in the direction of the points in the wing and taper into a fine line the closer they get to that point.

 

Step 15: Add fingers to the other wing

How to Draw a Bat Step by Step

Photo & Art: Margherita Cole | My Modern Met

Repeat steps 10–15 on the other wing. Remember to take into account the foreshortening and adjust the length of fingers when needed.

 

Step 16: Define the toes

How to Draw a Bat Step by Step

Photo & Art: Margherita Cole | My Modern Met

Now, break up the rectangular feet into five long and slender toes.

 

Step 17: Refine the drawing

How to Draw a Bat Step by Step

Photo & Art: Margherita Cole | My Modern Met

Continue to refine the drawing by erasing the geometrical shapes and adding textural lines to the body and face. You can also use this time to compare your illustration with some reference photos to see if you need to fix any areas.

 

Step 18: Add a background

How to Draw a Bat Step by Step

Photo & Art: Margherita Cole | My Modern Met

If you want to give your drawing of a bat a narrative, then consider adding a simple background. For instance, since this bat is soaring through the sky, you can add a full moon and some clouds.

 

Step 19: Go over the drawing in ink

How to Draw a Bat Step by Step

Photo & Art: Margherita Cole | My Modern Met

Finally, it is time to complete your illustration of a bat by going over it in pen and ink. So, using your pen of choice, trace your pencil drawing. Once you've gone over all of the lines, consider filling in some of the areas with shading techniques such as stippling or hatching to add texture and depth. Fill in any black areas last so you avoid smearing ink.

Then, erase any remaining pencil marks, and voila! You've learned how to draw a bat.

 

Looking for others who love drawing? Join our Art, Design, Photography, and Drawing Club on Facebook!

 

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Margherita Cole

Margherita Cole is a Contributing Writer at My Modern Met and illustrator based in Southern California. She holds a BA in Art History with a minor in Studio Art from Wofford College, and an MA in Illustration: Authorial Practice from Falmouth University in the UK. When she’s not writing, Margherita continues to develop her creative practice in sequential art.
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