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Clusters of Birdhouses Fantastically Wrap Around Trees

Well-designed architecture doesn't have to just sit on the ground. It's also for the birds and the trees, which is the idea behind the sculptural installation Spontaneous City in the Tree of Heaven located in London. The outdoor artwork features several hundred bird boxes carefully placed on two Ailanthus Altissima trees, and it aims to provide something that both the public can enjoy and our feathery friends will use. It was commissioned by Up Projects with the houses crafted by Jo Joelson and Bruce Gilchrist, also known as London Fieldworks.

These houses don't look like your typical bird boxes; the tiny sculptures are reminiscent of a beehive and are clustered together along the trunk of a tree. They adhere to its form and travel in the direction of its branches. Their design is meant to reflect the surrounding architecture, which is a combination of Georgian town houses, 1960's social housing, and the World's End Estate that's adjacent to one of the tree's locations.

If you'd like to view Spontaneous City, there are two places in London to do so. Head to Duncan Terrace Gardens in east and Cremorne Gardens in the west and look up.




London Fieldworks website
via [Slow Art Day and Yatzer]

Sara Barnes

Sara Barnes is a Staff Editor at My Modern Met and Manager of My Modern Met Store. As an illustrator and writer living in Seattle, she chronicles illustration, embroidery, and beyond through her blog Brown Paper Bag and Instagram @brwnpaperbag. She wrote a book about embroidery artist Sarah K. Benning titled 'Embroidered Life' that was published by Chronicle Books in 2019. Sara is a graduate of the Maryland Institute College of Art. She earned her BFA in Illustration in 2008 and MFA in Illustration Practice in 2013.

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