Masterfully Carved Wood Sculpture of a Submerged Man with a Pixelated Glitch

Hsu Tung Han wood sculptor

Taiwanese sculptor Hsu Tung Han is back with another incredible pixelated sculpture. Manipulating wood into human forms, his works are contemporary masterpieces that are both soothing and puzzling. As is typical of his work, this new sculpture features strategic pixelated blocks emerging from the figurative statue, an old world technique meeting hints of new world technology.

Han's newest work depicts a snorkeler, the pixelations mimicking the bubbling water that flows around the man as he breathes out of his snorkel. The idea of submerging into water is achieved through the figure's hair, flowing upward and dissolving into nothing. Powerful, yet peaceful, the combining of natural elements like wood and water make for a dynamic pairing.

With this piece, Han draws attention to the differing wood blocks within the snorkeler's body. The slightly different tones and varying wood grains enhance the depth of the contemporary sculpture, as they appear to worm their way out of the body until liberated freely.

Hsu Tung Han is known for his pixelated wood sculptures. His newest piece depicts a snorkeler submerged in water.

Hsu Tung Han contemporary Wood SculptureHsu Tung Han wood sculptorHsu Tung Han pixelated SculptureHsu Tung Han contemporary Wood SculptureHsu Tung Han contemporary Wood SculptureHsu Tung Han wood sculptorHsu Tung Han contemporary Wood SculptureHsu Tung Han wood sculptorHsu Tung Han: Website | Flickr
h/t: [reddit]

All images via Hsu Tung Han.

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Jessica Stewart

Jessica Stewart is a Contributing Writer and Digital Media Specialist for My Modern Met, as well as a curator and art historian. She earned her MA in Renaissance Studies from University College London and now lives in Rome, Italy. She cultivated expertise in street art which led to the purchase of her photographic archive by the Treccani Italian Encyclopedia in 2014. When she’s not spending time with her three dogs, she also manages the studio of a successful street artist. In 2013, she authored the book 'Street Art Stories Roma' and most recently contributed to 'Crossroads: A Glimpse Into the Life of Alice Pasquini'. You can follow her adventures online at @romephotoblog.

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