Light Art Created Using Microsoft Kinect


While most people see Microsoft Kinect as a way to get their “dance” on, artist and photographer Audrey Penven saw it as way to create something surreal and otherworldly. After learning that Kinect could project a pattern of infrared dots known as “structured light,” she enlisted the help of some friends. First, her roommate Mike modified his camera with an infrared filter. Then, artist and animator Aaron Muszalski helped Penven with concepts. Finally, Ian Baker assisted with lighting arrangements.

“The Kinect uses the deformation of this dot pattern to derive 3D information about its subjects,” she says.

“As a photographer I am most interested in the nature and quality of light: how light behaves in the physical world, and how it interacts with and affects the subjects that it illuminates. For this shoot my models and I were essentially working blind, with the results visible only after each image was captured. Together, we explored the unique physicality of structured light, finding our way in the darkness by touch and intuition. Dancing with invisible light.”









You can see these photos at a new gallery exhibition, “Dancing with Invisible Light,” which opens this Friday at Pictopia in Emeryville, Calif.

Audrey Penven’s website

via [Laughing Squid], [CNET]





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