Adorable Dog Sculptures Made with Bicycle Parts

Israeli artist Nirit Levav solders and welds discarded bicycle parts together to create adorable dog sculptures for her series titled HOW! WOW! The former fashion designer specializing in bridal gowns decided to switch gears and experiment with more durable forms of art. Seeking to get away from working with people and fragile fabrics, the multidisciplinary artist turned to local bike shops and motor garages to upcycle bicycle chains, seats, pedals, and any other parts she could salvage.

After making a conscious decision to turn her artistic attention to industrial materials, Levav chose to concentrate her craft on the solitary subject of canines. Starting her experimental metallic scrap project with the intent of recreating a very “tough and intimidating” Rottweiler, the artist found that the product was actually rather cute. It encouraged her to create another one, this time an Afghan Hound with long shaggy hair simulated with the flexible movement of bicycle chains. She says that the construction of each dog has led to the assembly of the next. Now, she has amassed quite a collection of dog sculptures, each one playfully filled with a unique personality.

Nirit Levav: Website | Facebook
via [Lost At E Minor]



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